Updating Call Arguments


The stats::update function is one of my favorite tools in R. Using this function saves a lot of time and effort when needing to modify an object. However, this function has its limits. The following is an example of how to extend the use of stats::update.

This post is an extension of the lightening talk I gave to the Denver R Users Group in March of 2016. You can get the slides from that talk from my github page.

Basics of the stats::update function

The documentation for the stats::update function is a good starting place. Of course, examples are even better. We’ll use the diamonds data set from within the ggplot2 package for the examples. By default, the cut, color, and clarity elements of the diamonds data set are ordered factors. I’m going to remove the order and level these variables as just factors.

data("diamonds", package = "ggplot2")

diamonds$cut     <- factor(diamonds$cut, ordered = FALSE)
diamonds$color   <- factor(diamonds$color, ordered = FALSE)
diamonds$clarity <- factor(diamonds$clarity, ordered = FALSE)

dplyr::glimpse(diamonds) 
## Observations: 53,940
## Variables: 10
## $ carat   <dbl> 0.23, 0.21, 0.23, 0.29, 0.31, 0.24, 0.24, 0.26, 0.22, ...
## $ cut     <fctr> Ideal, Premium, Good, Premium, Good, Very Good, Very ...
## $ color   <fctr> E, E, E, I, J, J, I, H, E, H, J, J, F, J, E, E, I, J,...
## $ clarity <fctr> SI2, SI1, VS1, VS2, SI2, VVS2, VVS1, SI1, VS2, VS1, S...
## $ depth   <dbl> 61.5, 59.8, 56.9, 62.4, 63.3, 62.8, 62.3, 61.9, 65.1, ...
## $ table   <dbl> 55, 61, 65, 58, 58, 57, 57, 55, 61, 61, 55, 56, 61, 54...
## $ price   <int> 326, 326, 327, 334, 335, 336, 336, 337, 337, 338, 339,...
## $ x       <dbl> 3.95, 3.89, 4.05, 4.20, 4.34, 3.94, 3.95, 4.07, 3.87, ...
## $ y       <dbl> 3.98, 3.84, 4.07, 4.23, 4.35, 3.96, 3.98, 4.11, 3.78, ...
## $ z       <dbl> 2.43, 2.31, 2.31, 2.63, 2.75, 2.48, 2.47, 2.53, 2.49, ...

A simple regression model, a lm object, will be used for our examples. Let’s regress the price of diamonds as a function of carat, cut, color, and clarity.

original_fit <- lm(price ~ carat + cut + color + clarity, data = diamonds)

Updating a call

The stats::update function works by calling getCall which calls getElement. While that is nice to know, the take away message is that if you have an object with an element called call, then stat::update gives you assess to modify the call.

Let’s update the regression formula. Say instead of the four predictors we started with we want to regress price on the depth and table of the diamonds

updated_fit_1 <- update(original_fit, formula = . ~ depth + table)

In the code chunk above, the update call took the original_fit object as its first argument and then we provided the formula = . ~ depth + table argent to tell the interpreter that we want to modify the formula. The . is shorthand for “the current,” i.e., use the current left hand side of the formula, and replace the right hand side with the depth + table.

Using getCall we can see that the two objects have different calls, and the calls we would expect them to have.

getCall(original_fit)
## lm(formula = price ~ carat + cut + color + clarity, data = diamonds)
getCall(updated_fit_1)
## lm(formula = price ~ depth + table, data = diamonds)

One more sanity check: the regression coefficients for these two models are, at least in name, as expected:

coef(original_fit)
##  (Intercept)        carat      cutGood cutVery Good   cutPremium 
##   -7362.8022    8886.1289     655.7674     848.7169     869.3959 
##     cutIdeal       colorE       colorF       colorG       colorH 
##     998.2544    -211.6825    -303.3100    -506.1995    -978.6977 
##       colorI       colorJ   claritySI2   claritySI1   clarityVS2 
##   -1440.3019   -2325.2224    2625.9500    3573.6880    4217.8291 
##   clarityVS1  clarityVVS2  clarityVVS1    clarityIF 
##    4534.8790    4967.1994    5072.0276    5419.6468
coef(updated_fit_1)
##  (Intercept)        depth        table 
## -15084.96675     82.26159    242.58346

We can update more than just the formula in the call. Perhaps you want to fit the same regression model on a subset of the data, for example, use the same regression formula as in original_fit but subset the data to only diamonds with a carat weight under 2.

updated_fit_2 <- update(original_fit, data = dplyr::filter(diamonds, carat < 2))
getCall(updated_fit_2)
## lm(formula = price ~ carat + cut + color + clarity, data = dplyr::filter(diamonds, 
##     carat < 2))

coef(original_fit)
##  (Intercept)        carat      cutGood cutVery Good   cutPremium 
##   -7362.8022    8886.1289     655.7674     848.7169     869.3959 
##     cutIdeal       colorE       colorF       colorG       colorH 
##     998.2544    -211.6825    -303.3100    -506.1995    -978.6977 
##       colorI       colorJ   claritySI2   claritySI1   clarityVS2 
##   -1440.3019   -2325.2224    2625.9500    3573.6880    4217.8291 
##   clarityVS1  clarityVVS2  clarityVVS1    clarityIF 
##    4534.8790    4967.1994    5072.0276    5419.6468
coef(updated_fit_2)
##  (Intercept)        carat      cutGood cutVery Good   cutPremium 
##   -6162.1964    8724.8278     527.6717     712.9909     744.0746 
##     cutIdeal       colorE       colorF       colorG       colorH 
##     861.5481    -223.8747    -313.4734    -508.2788    -996.4275 
##       colorI       colorJ   claritySI2   claritySI1   clarityVS2 
##   -1492.3535   -2210.0376    1635.1460    2580.1405    3240.4271 
##   clarityVS1  clarityVVS2  clarityVVS1    clarityIF 
##    3568.3900    3999.7614    4094.5453    4437.4743

A second way to achieve the same results as seen with updated_fit_2 is to use the update function to add to the call:

updated_fit_3 <- update(original_fit, subset = carat < 2)
getCall(updated_fit_3)
## lm(formula = price ~ carat + cut + color + clarity, data = diamonds, 
##     subset = carat < 2)

coef(original_fit)
##  (Intercept)        carat      cutGood cutVery Good   cutPremium 
##   -7362.8022    8886.1289     655.7674     848.7169     869.3959 
##     cutIdeal       colorE       colorF       colorG       colorH 
##     998.2544    -211.6825    -303.3100    -506.1995    -978.6977 
##       colorI       colorJ   claritySI2   claritySI1   clarityVS2 
##   -1440.3019   -2325.2224    2625.9500    3573.6880    4217.8291 
##   clarityVS1  clarityVVS2  clarityVVS1    clarityIF 
##    4534.8790    4967.1994    5072.0276    5419.6468
all.equal(coef(updated_fit_3), coef(updated_fit_2))
## [1] TRUE

Lastly, before we move onto more interesting examples, you can always update more than one part of a call with one update call

updated_fit_4 <- update(original_fit, 
                        formula = . ~ depth, 
                        data    = dplyr::filter(diamonds, carat < 2), 
                        subset  = cut %in% c("Good", "Very Good"))
getCall(updated_fit_4)
## lm(formula = price ~ depth, data = dplyr::filter(diamonds, carat < 
##     2), subset = cut %in% c("Good", "Very Good"))
summary(updated_fit_4)
## 
## Call:
## lm(formula = price ~ depth, data = dplyr::filter(diamonds, carat < 
##     2), subset = cut %in% c("Good", "Very Good"))
## 
## Residuals:
##     Min      1Q  Median      3Q     Max 
## -3316.1 -2596.6  -954.8  1364.0 15272.6 
## 
## Coefficients:
##             Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
## (Intercept)  5027.60     934.21   5.382 7.48e-08 ***
## depth         -24.33      15.07  -1.615    0.106    
## ---
## Signif. codes:  0 '***' 0.001 '**' 0.01 '*' 0.05 '.' 0.1 ' ' 1
## 
## Residual standard error: 3187 on 16321 degrees of freedom
## Multiple R-squared:  0.0001598,	Adjusted R-squared:  9.852e-05 
## F-statistic: 2.608 on 1 and 16321 DF,  p-value: 0.1063

Modifying a Variable on the Right Hand Side

Let’s work with the original_fit object again and modify the right hand side of the regression formula to use a centered and scaled version of carat. (You can quickly center and scale a variable by calling scale. The default behavior is to center and scale by subtracting off the mean and dividing by the standard deviation.) If you attempt to update the formula as . ~ . + scale(carat) where the . is a reuse operator, the result will be nonsensical.

scaled_fit_1 <- update(original_fit, formula = . ~ . + scale(carat))
getCall(scaled_fit_1)
## lm(formula = price ~ carat + cut + color + clarity + scale(carat), 
##     data = diamonds)
coef(scaled_fit_1)
##  (Intercept)        carat      cutGood cutVery Good   cutPremium 
##   -7362.8022    8886.1289     655.7674     848.7169     869.3959 
##     cutIdeal       colorE       colorF       colorG       colorH 
##     998.2544    -211.6825    -303.3100    -506.1995    -978.6977 
##       colorI       colorJ   claritySI2   claritySI1   clarityVS2 
##   -1440.3019   -2325.2224    2625.9500    3573.6880    4217.8291 
##   clarityVS1  clarityVVS2  clarityVVS1    clarityIF scale(carat) 
##    4534.8790    4967.1994    5072.0276    5419.6468           NA

Note that carat appears twice in the right hand side of the formula. Further, the regression coefficient for scale(carat) is NA as this vector in the design matrix is a linear function of carat. We’ve created a regression model with a rank deficient design matrix. Oops.

Obviously, we need to omit carat and replace with scale(carat) in the updated formula. Two ways to do this.

  1. Don’t use the . on the right hand side and write out the full right hand side yourself. This option requires too much effort and would suck to maintain.

  2. Continue to use the . on the right hand side and omit carat via -

scaled_fit_2 <- update(original_fit, formula = . ~ . - carat + scale(carat))
getCall(scaled_fit_2)
## lm(formula = price ~ cut + color + clarity + scale(carat), data = diamonds)
coef(scaled_fit_2)
##  (Intercept)      cutGood cutVery Good   cutPremium     cutIdeal 
##    -272.2067     655.7674     848.7169     869.3959     998.2544 
##       colorE       colorF       colorG       colorH       colorI 
##    -211.6825    -303.3100    -506.1995    -978.6977   -1440.3019 
##       colorJ   claritySI2   claritySI1   clarityVS2   clarityVS1 
##   -2325.2224    2625.9500    3573.6880    4217.8291    4534.8790 
##  clarityVVS2  clarityVVS1    clarityIF scale(carat) 
##    4967.1994    5072.0276    5419.6468    4212.1250

Cool. That worked well.

Now, what if we wanted to only center carat instead of centering and scaling? This would require adding scale(carat, scale = FALSE) to the right hand side of the formula. Starting with the scaled_fit_2 object we find that this task can be difficult as the full text of scale(carat) needs to be omitted. In the following chunk you’ll see that scaled_fit_3 does not have the desired formula whereas scaled_fit_4 does.

scaled_fit_3 <-
  update(scaled_fit_2, formula = . ~ . + scale(carat, scale = FALSE))
scaled_fit_4 <-
  update(scaled_fit_2, formula = . ~ . - scale(carat) + scale(carat, scale = FALSE))

getCall(scaled_fit_3)
## lm(formula = price ~ cut + color + clarity + scale(carat) + scale(carat, 
##     scale = FALSE), data = diamonds)
getCall(scaled_fit_4)
## lm(formula = price ~ cut + color + clarity + scale(carat, scale = FALSE), 
##     data = diamonds)

Okay, one more problem. Let’s start with scaled_fit_4 and scale, but not center carat. In the chunk below, scaled_fit_5 does not have the desired result, but scaled_fit_6 does.

scaled_fit_5 <-
  update(scaled_fit_4,
         formula = . ~ . - scale(carat) + scale(carat, center = TRUE))
scaled_fit_6 <-p
## Error in eval(expr, envir, enclos): object 'p' not found
  update(scaled_fit_4,
         formula = . ~ . - scale(carat, scale = FALSE) + scale(carat, center = TRUE))
## 
## Call:
## lm(formula = price ~ cut + color + clarity + scale(carat, center = TRUE), 
##     data = diamonds)
## 
## Coefficients:
##                 (Intercept)                      cutGood  
##                      -272.2                        655.8  
##                cutVery Good                   cutPremium  
##                       848.7                        869.4  
##                    cutIdeal                       colorE  
##                       998.3                       -211.7  
##                      colorF                       colorG  
##                      -303.3                       -506.2  
##                      colorH                       colorI  
##                      -978.7                      -1440.3  
##                      colorJ                   claritySI2  
##                     -2325.2                       2625.9  
##                  claritySI1                   clarityVS2  
##                      3573.7                       4217.8  
##                  clarityVS1                  clarityVVS2  
##                      4534.9                       4967.2  
##                 clarityVVS1                    clarityIF  
##                      5072.0                       5419.6  
## scale(carat, center = TRUE)  
##                      4212.1
                                                                           
getCall(scaled_fit_5)
## lm(formula = price ~ cut + color + clarity + scale(carat, scale = FALSE) + 
##     scale(carat, center = TRUE), data = diamonds)
getCall(scaled_fit_6)
## Error in getCall(scaled_fit_6): object 'scaled_fit_6' not found

So, what do you think? The update function is great, but is has some limitations. Imaging if you had a function of a variable with several options, or just one option with a very long value. Update might not be that useful. For example, instead of scaling carat, let’s move it into bins using the cut() function. (The fact that there is a variable and a function both called cut on the right hand side could be confusing. I selected this data set for this example specifically because it had a meaningful variable name of cut. We will see why this is important later.)

cut_fit_1 <-
  update(original_fit,
         formula = . ~ . - carat + 
                       cut(carat, 
                           breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5),
                           right = FALSE)
         )
names(coef(cut_fit_1))
##  [1] "(Intercept)"                                                     
##  [2] "cutGood"                                                         
##  [3] "cutVery Good"                                                    
##  [4] "cutPremium"                                                      
##  [5] "cutIdeal"                                                        
##  [6] "colorE"                                                          
##  [7] "colorF"                                                          
##  [8] "colorG"                                                          
##  [9] "colorH"                                                          
## [10] "colorI"                                                          
## [11] "colorJ"                                                          
## [12] "claritySI2"                                                      
## [13] "claritySI1"                                                      
## [14] "clarityVS2"                                                      
## [15] "clarityVS1"                                                      
## [16] "clarityVVS2"                                                     
## [17] "clarityVVS1"                                                     
## [18] "clarityIF"                                                       
## [19] "cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)[0.5,1)"
## [20] "cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)[1,1.5)"
## [21] "cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)[1.5,2)"
## [22] "cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)[2,2.5)"
## [23] "cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)[2.5,3)"
## [24] "cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)[3,3.5)"
## [25] "cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)[3.5,4)"
## [26] "cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)[4,4.5)"
## [27] "cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)[4.5,5)"
## [28] "cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)[5,5.5)"

Now, we have a regression model for price with the cut, color, and clarity accounted for, and a 11 level factor for carat, the interval [0, 0.5) is the reference level here.

If you only had the cut_fit_1 object to start with, using the update function to modify the options passed to cut() would be a pain. Having to type out the old cut() call exactly as provide and then replace with a new cut() call. This is too much work and a pain to maintain. Just start with a fresh call to lm. Or, let’s be clever and build some new tools to do this work.

Modifying a call within a formula

First, let’s look at the structure of a formula. We’ll use the object f, defined below, as the primary object in this example.

f <- price ~ color + cut + clarity + cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE) 
f
## price ~ color + cut + clarity + cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, 
##     by = 0.5), right = FALSE)
str(f)
## Class 'formula'  language price ~ color + cut + clarity + cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5),      right = FALSE)
##   ..- attr(*, ".Environment")=<environment: R_GlobalEnv>
is.list(f)
## [1] FALSE
is.recursive(f)
## [1] TRUE

We have a language object with it an environment attribute. This object is not a list, but it is recursive (“is.recursive(x) returns TRUE if x has a recursive (list-like) structure and FALSE otherwise). So, if we recursively apply as.list to f object we see a controlled deconstruction of the formula object.

as.list(f)
## [[1]]
## `~`
## 
## [[2]]
## price
## 
## [[3]]
## color + cut + clarity + cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), 
##     right = FALSE)
lapply(as.list(f), as.list) 
## [[1]]
## [[1]][[1]]
## `~`
## 
## 
## [[2]]
## [[2]][[1]]
## price
## 
## 
## [[3]]
## [[3]][[1]]
## `+`
## 
## [[3]][[2]]
## color + cut + clarity
## 
## [[3]][[3]]
## cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5), right = FALSE)

What happens when we apply as.list to the third element of the .Last.value?

lapply(lapply(as.list(f), as.list)[[3]], as.list)
## [[1]]
## [[1]][[1]]
## `+`
## 
## 
## [[2]]
## [[2]][[1]]
## `+`
## 
## [[2]][[2]]
## color + cut
## 
## [[2]][[3]]
## clarity
## 
## 
## [[3]]
## [[3]][[1]]
## cut
## 
## [[3]][[2]]
## carat
## 
## [[3]]$breaks
## seq(0, 5.5, by = 0.5)
## 
## [[3]]$right
## [1] FALSE

Look at the elements of the third element, the cut() call is the first sub-element followed by the arguments x (implicitly) and breaks (explicitly).

This is great! If a formula is reconstructed recursively then we can access the arguments of calls within the formula.

Let’s start building a function to fully reconstruct a formula object into it’s parts.

decon <- function(x) {
  if (is.recursive(x)) {
    lapply(as.list(x), decon)
  } else { 
    x
  }
}

The decon function rips apart any recursive object until only the non-recursive elements remain. Passing f to decon yields:

decon(f) 
## [[1]]
## `~`
## 
## [[2]]
## price
## 
## [[3]]
## [[3]][[1]]
## `+`
## 
## [[3]][[2]]
## [[3]][[2]][[1]]
## `+`
## 
## [[3]][[2]][[2]]
## [[3]][[2]][[2]][[1]]
## `+`
## 
## [[3]][[2]][[2]][[2]]
## color
## 
## [[3]][[2]][[2]][[3]]
## cut
## 
## 
## [[3]][[2]][[3]]
## clarity
## 
## 
## [[3]][[3]]
## [[3]][[3]][[1]]
## cut
## 
## [[3]][[3]][[2]]
## carat
## 
## [[3]][[3]]$breaks
## [[3]][[3]]$breaks[[1]]
## seq
## 
## [[3]][[3]]$breaks[[2]]
## [1] 0
## 
## [[3]][[3]]$breaks[[3]]
## [1] 5.5
## 
## [[3]][[3]]$breaks$by
## [1] 0.5
## 
## 
## [[3]][[3]]$right
## [1] FALSE

where we can see a hierarchy for each element and sub-element. Take careful notice of element [[3]][[3]][[1]]. When the deconstruction of the formula runs into the cut() call, the first element is the name of the call itself, followed by the arguments thereto. This is illustrated again with respect to the seq call.

Now, before we try to modify any arguments, we need decon to return a formual object. After all, the point of this is to modify a formula. By wrapping the lapply in a as.call if x is recursive we gain the desired behavior.

decon <- function(x) {
  if (is.recursive(x)) {
    as.call(lapply(as.list(x), decon))
  } else { 
    x
  }
}
decon(f)
## price ~ color + cut + clarity + cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, 
##     by = 0.5), right = FALSE)
all.equal(decon(f), f)
## [1] TRUE

Why? Well, each deconstruction is a list with an operator, a named call, as the first element followed by two arguments. A simple example with addition:

as.call(list(`+`, 1, 2))
## .Primitive("+")(1, 2)

eval(as.call(list(`+`, 1, 2))) 
## [1] 3

By wrapping the lapply in the as.call within the decon function we preserve the unevaluated calls until the end of the recursion when the call is implicitly evaluated.

The next step in our journey is to modify decon such that arguments to the cut call can be updated. Specifically, we want to change the value of the breaks argument. Just to be clear, the stats::update function can’t do this.

update(cut(carat, breaks = c(1, 1)), breaks = c(3, 4))
## Error in cut(carat, breaks = c(1, 1)): object 'carat' not found

We are looking for a call named cut, and to modify the breaks argument. Using is.call will differentiate between the cut call and the cut variable.

decon <- function(x, nb) {
  if (is.call(x) && grepl("cut", deparse(x[[1]]))) {
    x$breaks <- nb
    x
  } else if (is.recursive(x)) {
    as.call(lapply(as.list(x), decon, nb))
  } else {
    x
  }
}
f
## price ~ color + cut + clarity + cut(carat, breaks = seq(0, 5.5, 
##     by = 0.5), right = FALSE)
decon(f, c(0, 3))
## price ~ color + cut + clarity + cut(carat, breaks = c(0, 3), 
##     right = FALSE)

We’re almost there. The return from decon is a formula. However, we have not dealt with the environments. Let’s place decon within another function, call it newbreaks and then handle environments and calls. While not necessary, to make it clear which functions are being called we will give use the name local_decon within the newbreaks function.

newbreaks <- function(form, nb) {
  local_decon <- function(x, nb) {
    if (is.call(x) && grepl("cut", deparse(x[[1]]))) {
      x$breaks <- nb
      x
    } else if (is.recursive(x)) {
      as.call(lapply(as.list(x), local_decon, nb))
    } else {
      x
    }
  }

  out <- lapply(as.list(form), local_decon, nb)
  out <- eval(as.call(out))
  environment(out) <- environment(form)
  out
}

newbreaks(f, c(0, 3)) 
## price ~ color + cut + clarity + cut(carat, breaks = c(0, 3), 
##     right = FALSE)

This is great! Now we are able to modify the breaks within a cut call within a formula! In practice we could do the following:

new_fit_1 <-
  update(cut_fit_1, formula = newbreaks(formula(cut_fit_1), c(0, 1, 2)))
new_fit_2 <-
  update(cut_fit_1, formula = newbreaks(formula(cut_fit_1), c(0, 1, 3, 5)))
new_fit_3 <-
  update(cut_fit_1, formula = newbreaks(formula(cut_fit_1), seq(0, 5.5, by = 1.25)))

names(coef(new_fit_1))
##  [1] "(Intercept)"                                        
##  [2] "cutGood"                                            
##  [3] "cutVery Good"                                       
##  [4] "cutPremium"                                         
##  [5] "cutIdeal"                                           
##  [6] "colorE"                                             
##  [7] "colorF"                                             
##  [8] "colorG"                                             
##  [9] "colorH"                                             
## [10] "colorI"                                             
## [11] "colorJ"                                             
## [12] "claritySI2"                                         
## [13] "claritySI1"                                         
## [14] "clarityVS2"                                         
## [15] "clarityVS1"                                         
## [16] "clarityVVS2"                                        
## [17] "clarityVVS1"                                        
## [18] "clarityIF"                                          
## [19] "cut(carat, breaks = c(0, 1, 2), right = FALSE)[1,2)"
names(coef(new_fit_2))
##  [1] "(Intercept)"                                           
##  [2] "cutGood"                                               
##  [3] "cutVery Good"                                          
##  [4] "cutPremium"                                            
##  [5] "cutIdeal"                                              
##  [6] "colorE"                                                
##  [7] "colorF"                                                
##  [8] "colorG"                                                
##  [9] "colorH"                                                
## [10] "colorI"                                                
## [11] "colorJ"                                                
## [12] "claritySI2"                                            
## [13] "claritySI1"                                            
## [14] "clarityVS2"                                            
## [15] "clarityVS1"                                            
## [16] "clarityVVS2"                                           
## [17] "clarityVVS1"                                           
## [18] "clarityIF"                                             
## [19] "cut(carat, breaks = c(0, 1, 3, 5), right = FALSE)[1,3)"
## [20] "cut(carat, breaks = c(0, 1, 3, 5), right = FALSE)[3,5)"
names(coef(new_fit_3))
##  [1] "(Intercept)"                                                           
##  [2] "cutGood"                                                               
##  [3] "cutVery Good"                                                          
##  [4] "cutPremium"                                                            
##  [5] "cutIdeal"                                                              
##  [6] "colorE"                                                                
##  [7] "colorF"                                                                
##  [8] "colorG"                                                                
##  [9] "colorH"                                                                
## [10] "colorI"                                                                
## [11] "colorJ"                                                                
## [12] "claritySI2"                                                            
## [13] "claritySI1"                                                            
## [14] "clarityVS2"                                                            
## [15] "clarityVS1"                                                            
## [16] "clarityVVS2"                                                           
## [17] "clarityVVS1"                                                           
## [18] "clarityIF"                                                             
## [19] "cut(carat, breaks = c(0, 1.25, 2.5, 3.75, 5), right = FALSE)[1.25,2.5)"
## [20] "cut(carat, breaks = c(0, 1.25, 2.5, 3.75, 5), right = FALSE)[2.5,3.75)"
## [21] "cut(carat, breaks = c(0, 1.25, 2.5, 3.75, 5), right = FALSE)[3.75,5)"

Why, Why would you ever need this?

I hope the above examples would have answered this question. If not, here was my motivation. I have been working with B-splines, a lot. My Ph.D. dissertation focuses on B-spline regression models. I needed to be able to update a regression object with a new formula differing only by the internal knot locations within a spline. Originally, this meant using the splines::bs call and adjusting the knots argument while preserving the values passed to the degree, intercept and Boundary.knots arguments. If you are familiar with the splines::bs call then you’ll know that the there are default arguments to each of these after mentioned arguments.

Further, the objects I really needed to update where more complex than just an lm object and, as new software goes, had an ever changing API. Construction of calls was a lot of overhead. When the only thing that needed to be updated was one argument in one call within a formula it seemed reasonable to find a solution to do exactly what I needed and no more.

Once I publicly release my cpr package you’ll find, if you dig into the source code, functions cpr:::newknots and cpr:::newdfs to be critical functions in the implementation.

Acknowledgements: I didn’t figure out how to do this completely on my own. I had posed a question on stackoverflow which was the basis for this post and extensions.